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A journal of science, thought, and action.

Orion Rising

11

Nov

2018

Orion Rising

The Greeks named the constellations.

Read more
Alpine Indicators

10

Nov

2018

Alpine Indicators

Biological indicators are migrating uphill fast.

Read more
The Conservation Alliance

Archive Highlights

How to Glow: the Very Simple Way of Energy Making

How to Glow: the Very Simple Way of Energy Making

By Reilly Capps  If you break down the essence of energy like you're talking to a kindergartner, it really comes down to one thing: the sun....

24 May 2013

Video Highlights

Recent Archive Highlights

Krakatoa Awakens, an update

Krakatoa Awakens, an update 28 October 2018

Krakatoa Awakens, an update

Krakatoa is again active.

Rewilding

Rewilding 4 September 2018

Rewilding

A 'silent spring' could become a 'wild summer' 

Conserving, the Mother Load

Conserving, the Mother Load 26 June 2018

Conserving, the Mother Load

Avoiding another Dust Bowl.

Environmental Art

Environmental Art 15 January 2018

Environmental Art

Creating paintings with natue connections.

Patagonia and Sustainability

Patagonia and Sustainability 31 December 2017

Patagonia and Sustainability

Patagonia shows how to apply sustainability in business practice.

Where Good Ideas Come From

Where Good Ideas Come From 22 December 2017

Where Good Ideas Come From

A clever storyteller suggests an answer.

Point of View

In photography and video production vantage point matters. Like the old mantra for restaurant success that says “location, location, location” the documentary photographer requires “opportunity, opportunity, opportunity”. You can increase that chance of a good shot by the clever use of new technology to improve the odds. That’s just what exploration photographer George Steinmetz had done with a project to capture the most extreme deserts in the world from a new view. His field work has ...
  • 1487

Point of View

In photography and video production vantage point matters. Like the old mantra for restaurant success that says “location, location, location” the documentary photographer requires “opportunity, opportunity, opportunity”. You can increase that chance of a good shot by the clever use of new technology to improve the odds. That’s just what exploration photographer George Steinmetz had done with a project to capture the most extreme deserts in the world from a new view. His field work has ...
  • 1432

Point of View

In photography and video production vantage point matters. Like the old mantra for restaurant success that says “location, location, location” the documentary photographer requires “opportunity, opportunity, opportunity”. You can increase that chance of a good shot by the clever use of new technology to improve the odds. That’s just what exploration photographer George Steinmetz had done with a project to capture the most extreme deserts in the world from a new view. His field work has ...
  • 1458

Colorado is all fracked up

Rich with natural gas and the impacts, both good and bad, of its extraction, the state of Colorado is caught in a heated debate about gas drilling. A drilling rig near Parachute, Colo., in western Garfield County. Bob Ward photo. Over the last month, voters in the city of Longmont, on the urbanized Front Range, banned hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in which water, sand and chemicals are forced underground to release gas. But 100 miles south in Colorado Springs, the city council of ...
  • 1235

Colorado is all fracked up

Rich with natural gas and the impacts, both good and bad, of its extraction, the state of Colorado is caught in a heated debate about gas drilling. A drilling rig near Parachute, Colo., in western Garfield County. Bob Ward photo. Over the last month, voters in the city of Longmont, on the urbanized Front Range, banned hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in which water, sand and chemicals are forced underground to release gas. But 100 miles south in Colorado Springs, the city council of ...
  • 1390

Colorado is all fracked up

Rich with natural gas and the impacts, both good and bad, of its extraction, the state of Colorado is caught in a heated debate about gas drilling. A drilling rig near Parachute, Colo., in western Garfield County. Bob Ward photo. Over the last month, voters in the city of Longmont, on the urbanized Front Range, banned hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in which water, sand and chemicals are forced underground to release gas. But 100 miles south in Colorado Springs, the city council of ...
  • 1236

Too Harsh? Does Exxon Deserve a Break?

By Reilly Capps Is it possible to hate on Exxon Mobile too much? After all, they’re just a struggling little energy company making a tiny profit and asking legitimate questions about climate change. Does this video go too far? The makers are trying to raise money to put it on air. Of course, there’s no way Exxon hates your children. To hate your children, they’d have to care.
  • 1304

Too Harsh? Does Exxon Deserve a Break?

By Reilly Capps Is it possible to hate on Exxon Mobile too much? After all, they’re just a struggling little energy company making a tiny profit and asking legitimate questions about climate change. Does this video go too far? The makers are trying to raise money to put it on air. Of course, there’s no way Exxon hates your children. To hate your children, they’d have to care.
  • 1276

The Money Game on Climate Change

A blast from the past? A look at the future? Both? College students ask their institutions to divest from fossil fuel companies. As my old friend Justin Gillis writes: The students see it as a tactic that could force climate change, barely discussed in the presidential campaign, back onto the national political agenda. Divestment was a big part of bringing change to South Africa. What could it do for carbon? Harvard students voted to ask their endowment, America’s largest, to ...
  • 1332

The Money Game on Climate Change

A blast from the past? A look at the future? Both? College students ask their institutions to divest from fossil fuel companies. As my old friend Justin Gillis writes: The students see it as a tactic that could force climate change, barely discussed in the presidential campaign, back onto the national political agenda. Divestment was a big part of bringing change to South Africa. What could it do for carbon? Harvard students voted to ask their endowment, America’s largest, to ...
  • 1385

Too Harsh? Does Exxon Deserve a Break?

By Reilly Capps Is it possible to hate on Exxon Mobile too much? After all, they’re just a struggling little energy company making a tiny profit and asking legitimate questions about climate change. Does this video go too far? The makers are trying to raise money to put it on air. Of course, there’s no way Exxon hates your children. To hate your children, they’d have to care.
  • 1476

The Money Game on Climate Change

A blast from the past? A look at the future? Both? College students ask their institutions to divest from fossil fuel companies. As my old friend Justin Gillis writes: The students see it as a tactic that could force climate change, barely discussed in the presidential campaign, back onto the national political agenda. Divestment was a big part of bringing change to South Africa. What could it do for carbon? Harvard students voted to ask their endowment, America’s largest, to ...
  • 1355

Department of Silver Linings

Let’s give ourselves credit where credit is due: the U.S. isn't the MOST carbon-emitting country PER CAPITA. We're ninth. As you might expect, the countries that burp more carbon are mostly oil states like Kuwait. Plus some rich-ass enclaves like Luxembourg and the Dutch Antilles that have more money than sense. Positive reinforcement, people. Let’s pat ourselves on the back and say, “We’re better than Bahrain.” - Reilly Capps
  • 1308

Department of Silver Linings

Let’s give ourselves credit where credit is due: the U.S. isn't the MOST carbon-emitting country PER CAPITA. We're ninth. As you might expect, the countries that burp more carbon are mostly oil states like Kuwait. Plus some rich-ass enclaves like Luxembourg and the Dutch Antilles that have more money than sense. Positive reinforcement, people. Let’s pat ourselves on the back and say, “We’re better than Bahrain.” - Reilly Capps
  • 1316

Cue Ominous Music

By Reilly Capps Tell me this is not the most terrifying thing you've ever seen. The Chinese have plans to move 700 mountains in order to build a new metropolis in the Northwest. Their promotional real estate video looks like it was made by Zod. I urge you to watch it with the sound on (the horrifying part starts at about :20). If the music in this video is any indication, the Chinese clearly have no fears about being perceived as real-life, world-dominating evil geniuses. Reports ...
  • 1520

Cue Ominous Music

By Reilly Capps Tell me this is not the most terrifying thing you've ever seen. The Chinese have plans to move 700 mountains in order to build a new metropolis in the Northwest. Their promotional real estate video looks like it was made by Zod. I urge you to watch it with the sound on (the horrifying part starts at about :20). If the music in this video is any indication, the Chinese clearly have no fears about being perceived as real-life, world-dominating evil geniuses. Reports ...
  • 1632

Cue Ominous Music

By Reilly Capps Tell me this is not the most terrifying thing you've ever seen. The Chinese have plans to move 700 mountains in order to build a new metropolis in the Northwest. Their promotional real estate video looks like it was made by Zod. I urge you to watch it with the sound on (the horrifying part starts at about :20). If the music in this video is any indication, the Chinese clearly have no fears about being perceived as real-life, world-dominating evil geniuses. Reports ...
  • 1032

Department of Silver Linings

Let’s give ourselves credit where credit is due: the U.S. isn't the MOST carbon-emitting country PER CAPITA. We're ninth. As you might expect, the countries that burp more carbon are mostly oil states like Kuwait. Plus some rich-ass enclaves like Luxembourg and the Dutch Antilles that have more money than sense. Positive reinforcement, people. Let’s pat ourselves on the back and say, “We’re better than Bahrain.” - Reilly Capps
  • 1205

And the Records Just Keep Falling

How hot has it been this year? So hot there are fried eggs – in birds’ nests. So hot marble statues have pit stains. So hot the record books are melting. Says NOAA: The January-November period was the warmest first 11 months of any year on record for the contiguous United States, and for the entire year, 2012 will most likely surpass the current record (1998, 54.3°F) as the warmest year for the nation. That comes after a hot November that was especially hot and dry in my part of the ...
  • 1236

And the Records Just Keep Falling

How hot has it been this year? So hot there are fried eggs – in birds’ nests. So hot marble statues have pit stains. So hot the record books are melting. Says NOAA: The January-November period was the warmest first 11 months of any year on record for the contiguous United States, and for the entire year, 2012 will most likely surpass the current record (1998, 54.3°F) as the warmest year for the nation. That comes after a hot November that was especially hot and dry in my part of the ...
  • 1176

Earth & Moon: 2 New Views

Two dramatic maps of the Earth and Moon were just released by NASA. The new maps produced by orbiting satellites are providing strong impressions of both worlds. The new views of the Earth’s landforms and city lights is a composite assembled from photographs captured by the polar orbiting, Suomi satellite. The photos were acquired over 22 days between April and October, required 312 orbits of surface scanning, and gathered 2.5 terabytes of data of every parcel of land surface, oceans, and ...
  • 1523

Earth & Moon: 2 New Views

Two dramatic maps of the Earth and Moon were just released by NASA. The new maps produced by orbiting satellites are providing strong impressions of both worlds. The new views of the Earth’s landforms and city lights is a composite assembled from photographs captured by the polar orbiting, Suomi satellite. The photos were acquired over 22 days between April and October, required 312 orbits of surface scanning, and gathered 2.5 terabytes of data of every parcel of land surface, oceans, and ...
  • 1313

And the Records Just Keep Falling

How hot has it been this year? So hot there are fried eggs – in birds’ nests. So hot marble statues have pit stains. So hot the record books are melting. Says NOAA: The January-November period was the warmest first 11 months of any year on record for the contiguous United States, and for the entire year, 2012 will most likely surpass the current record (1998, 54.3°F) as the warmest year for the nation. That comes after a hot November that was especially hot and dry in my part of the ...
  • 1187

Earth & Moon: 2 New Views

Two dramatic maps of the Earth and Moon were just released by NASA. The new maps produced by orbiting satellites are providing strong impressions of both worlds. The new views of the Earth’s landforms and city lights is a composite assembled from photographs captured by the polar orbiting, Suomi satellite. The photos were acquired over 22 days between April and October, required 312 orbits of surface scanning, and gathered 2.5 terabytes of data of every parcel of land surface, oceans, and ...
  • 2996

River Notes

It has been said that  ‘a picture is worth 1000 words’  and the old adage is particularly true when trying to compare different landforms and the processes that created them. According to field studies in Utah, braided rivers once flowed during the Jurassic Era in what is now the San Rafael Swell near Hanksville, Utah. The rivers cut through bedrock, chiseled valleys, and deposited sand and gravel on their bottoms. The sandy deposits hardened into erosion-resistant sandstone caps, while ...
  • 1686

River Notes

It has been said that  ‘a picture is worth 1000 words’  and the old adage is particularly true when trying to compare different landforms and the processes that created them. According to field studies in Utah, braided rivers once flowed during the Jurassic Era in what is now the San Rafael Swell near Hanksville, Utah. The rivers cut through bedrock, chiseled valleys, and deposited sand and gravel on their bottoms. The sandy deposits hardened into erosion-resistant sandstone caps, while ...
  • 1599
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