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A journal of science, thought, and action.

Why Do Societies Collapse?

27

Feb

2019

Why Do Societies Collapse?

Jared Diamond sees patterns in collapsing societies.

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Apollo 11 by Moonlight

20

Jul

2019

Apollo 11 by Moonlight

'One small step' 50 years ago and also a giant leap!

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Archive Highlights

A Monumental President

A Monumental President

Two new national monuments were designated.

26 Aug 2017

Video Highlights

 

The Conservation Alliance

 

Death of a Giant

In the Biblical fable, Methuselah lived in the year 1656 after the Creation and died at the age of nearly 1000 years old, seven days before Noah’s flood. The phrase "old as Methuselah," often refers to any living thing reaching great age. That would certainly be true for a giant Bald Cypress that was more than 3500 years old and just burned to the ground in a puzzling fire. The cypress was a sapling before the ancient Egyptians or Greeks built their temples and civilizations. It had been ...
  • 4259

Antiquarian Skylight

Exposing a piece of film over a long period of time, from a specific location, compresses the exposure, and creates a solargraph. The photographic technique requires a pinhole camera to capture the diffuse and thin light onto photo-sensitive paper or film. Pinhole photography is an early light capturing approach now being used to create modern art photos. The images look like they might have been discovered in an old trunk filled 19th Century daguerreotypes of  soldiers or cold winter ...
  • 4798

Monkey seen

Chill out everybody.  The Grizzled Langur has been found. 
  • 2715

Penguins Aren't People

by Conrad Anker Humans have a tendency to anthropomorphize animals. Penguins, with their tuxedo like plumage and waddle, are a fine example of how we extend characteristics and behavior of humans to animals. The physical similarity makes the connection to animals is logical--- they are born, they die, and they share a brief time span on this planet. Obviously penguins, cute and adorable as they are, would not be granted personhood in the Bill of Rights. Less obvious are corporations and ...
  • 2702

Another run at the Olympics

Forget the Olympics, I used to think. Sure, they look pretty, done up in rainbow colors with classiest necklaces this side of the British Crown Jewels, but the 1980 Olympics practically brought down the Soviet Empire, and the 1984 games left Los Angeles deeply in debt.  And so I was always perversely proud, as a fourth generation Coloradan, that my wise ancestors rejected the 1976 Olympic games' invitation to dance, the only time that's ever happened. We rejected it as too expensive and too ...
  • 2757

Good News for Warblers

The voice of the Seychelles Warbler is often described as rich, melodious, and similar to a person whistling. An endemic bird found only in the Seychelles Islands, it is endangered, and was once close to extinction. At one point the entire population of warblers was down to 26 individuals all confined to a small rocky outcrop in the Indian Ocean, Cousin Island. So it is exciting to learn that captive breeding efforts between conservationists in the Seychelles and researchers in the United ...
  • 5514

Carnivorous Plants Get Creative

Carnivorous plants are true curiosities of the vegetable world. They exist in all environments but typically are found in waterlogged bogs or soils poor in essential nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus. To compensate for these mineral deficiencies, carnivorous plants evolved sticky leaves, pitcher-like structures, and snap-traps to capture unsuspecting insects and bugs get stuck in the plant which then provides with the missing environmental nutrients. Some carnivorous plants are able to ...
  • 2870

On Deniers

From way back in 2007, here's an oldie but a goodie, as climate scientist Richard C.J. Somerville drops some genius during a debate with exceptional novelist and noted climate blowhard Michael Crichton. The end is great, when he dismisses wing nuts like Crichton by summarizing: "it tends to be the rare exception rather than the rule when a lone genius eventually prevails over conventional mainstream scientific thought." Here's the whole excerpt:  The science community today has ...
  • 1886

Electric Shocks

Check out the Chevy Volt. It's not stylish. Based on looks alone, it probably ups your cool factor by about ... point five percent. If that.  The New York Post calls the Chevy Volt "one part lemon, one part government albatross."  In the article, the Cato Institute's Patrick Michaels offers a litany of facts and half-facts about the car's problems, and a list of the problems other eco cars are facing.  True, they're expensive -- about $40,000. True, the battery only powers ...
  • 1916
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Recent Archive Highlights

Intelligent Designers

Intelligent Designers 27 April 2019

Intelligent Designers

Portland replaces coal with intelligence.

Efficiency, Efficiency, & Efficiency!

Efficiency, Efficiency, & Efficiency! 21 April 2019

Efficiency, Efficiency, & Efficiency!

Energy efficiency is the 'name of the game'.

Lost & Found Worlds

Lost & Found Worlds 14 April 2019

Lost & Found Worlds

Biogeography rules: odd things evolve on islands.

Conserving, The Mother Load

Conserving, The Mother Load 19 March 2019

Conserving, The Mother Load

Avoiding another Dust Bowl.

Fishing for Plastic

Fishing for Plastic 5 March 2019

Fishing for Plastic

It takes garbage to make a boat.

Krakatoa Awakens, Update 2

Krakatoa Awakens, Update 2 29 December 2018

Krakatoa Awakens, Update 2

Krakatau is again active.

Archive